SoReDeWa = Then

SoReDeWa means “then” in Japanese.

Japanese people use the word in “Good Bye” as well.

SoReDeWa (Then) I will do this.  SoReDeWa (Then) let’s do this.  SoReDeWa (Then) what do you think?  

And

SoReDeWa bye!  (Bye, then!)

DeWa can be shortened as “Ja”.

So many Japanese use it as “SoReJa”.

SoReJa!
Bye now!

Dewa; Then and And and Now and Bye.

“DeWa” means “then” in Japanese.

But Japanese people quite often use it when they ask for leave.

They also use it for “now” as in “Now we start”.

In rehearsals, the director commands to reprise the scene by saying “DeWa” (“Now, please start”).

In eating, you say “DeWa” to start.

DeWa.
Another little word.
But strong word.
It starts things.

Ja; Well Then.

Japanese people use “Ja” quite often.

“Ja” is another magic word which can be used almost anything.

It’s just like “Well” in English.

“Ja” is “Good bye”.
“Ja” is “See you”.
“Ja” is “Yes”.
“Ja” is “No”.“
Ja” is “Then”

Japanese people love to shorten sentences. They don’t finish the sentence. The listeners must guess from both the situation, tone of the voice, and the facial expression.

It is strongly connected with Japanese mind (which I must tell you at some point in the future).

Ja. 
A little word.
A small word.
Meaning big.
Meaning a lot.

チームを伸ばす秘訣5

3月10日は、演劇国際交流ワークショップを開催しました。

中高生に、言葉がわからなくても、相手の意図や気持ちに敏感になることで対応力を養うために、演劇の俳優訓練方法を使います。

集まったのは、中学1年から高校3年まで、ちょうど男女バランスもいい感じで集まりました。

そこに講師陣とスタッフ(全員俳優、ひとりはライブインタラクション・コーチです)が一緒になってワークを進めていくので、一人一人に細かいケアが行き届き、実に良い時間になりました。

ゲームを使いながら名前を覚え、体と声をどんどん動かし、ここは何をしても安全で自由なところなんだとわかってもらいながら、中高生の想像力と創造性を引き出します。

4時間のワークの終わりは自分たちで物語を作り演じる課題がありましたが、本当に楽しそうに

次々にアイディアを出して夢中になって物語を作っている様子でした。

引っ込み思案な人だっていましたが、誰ひとり置いてけぼりにせず、みんなで一緒に進むんだ、という気持ちがグループ内に生まれてホッとしています。

ここ数日連載してきた、伸びるチームの秘訣が、手に取るようにわかった日でした。

私としても、こうして言葉にしていることが机上の空論ではなく、ちゃんと実践で証明できることをお伝えできて嬉しいです。

このワークショップでも拍手の威力は絶大でした。

そのうちに、ほんのわずかな進歩でもみんなが心から温かい拍手を自主的に送るようになりました。

最後のまとめで、ひとりひとりから、今日の学びを聞きました。

みんなちゃんと大きな階段を一つ登ってくれて、今日という日を企画できて本当に良かったと思えます。

私が思い至らず、全員の集合写真を撮り忘れてしまい、残っていた高校生たちとの写真しかありません。中学生の皆さん、ごめんなさい。ワークの最中の動画にはちゃんと残っていますので、後から切り出します。

【今日のライブインタラクション】

隣の人の小さなステップを見つけてあげよう。自分じゃなかなかわからないものだから。

PS

この、演劇国際交流ワークは、私が理事長を務めているNPO法人女性とくらしのネットワークが主催したもので、子どもゆめ基金の助成を受けています。

AriGato; thank you.

You may already know this word, AriGaTo (a-ri-ga-to).

It means “thank you”.

“Ari” means ‘be’, or ‘there is’.
“Ga-to” is from “gata-i”, meaning ‘rarely’.

It rarely happens.
What a rare thing!

The Japanese use this word only when receiving good things, words, deeds, and reaction.

“How rare this happiness is!” is AriGato.

You use the word almost any time, and that will smoothen the interaction.

AriGato is a magic word to make the world peaceful.

You combine the word with Oji-Gi, the bowing custom.

AriGato.
Thank you.
What a rare happiness from you!
The world is made with appreciation.

Te-re-Ka-ku-shi; Uneasy Smile

As I said before, Japanese are very shy and not good at expressing their feelings on their faces.

What’s more confusing is that they smile.

The Japanese smile when they are shy.
The Japanese smile when they are angry.
The Japanese smile when they are sorry.
The Japanese smile when they are interviewed by a TV reporter about very very tragical news.

Well, not always, of course.

But most of the time, for sure.

But please don’t think the Japanese are stupid or heartless.

We the Japanese simply don’t know how to deal with big feelings.

It is an uneasy smile.
Te-re-Ka-ku-shi, is the Japanese word.

Te-re means shyness and/or nervousness.
Ka-ku-shi means hiding.

Uneasy Smile.
Te-re-Ka-ku-shi.
Hiding nervousness.
By showing no harm.Beautiful.

Do-mo, a magic word

Along with bowing, we Japanese often (or rather, always) say “Domo, domo”.

Do-mo [do-mo] is one of the strangest words in Japanese.

You can use it both positively, negatively, questionably, thankfully, and at almost any situations.

The origin of the word Do-mo may be from “somehow”.
For, “Do-” means “how”.

You can use it when ….

..you receive something.
…you bump into somebody.
…you want to apologize.
…you want to show your appreciation.
…you are asked about your health and you don’t want to answer it.

Thinking about it, Do-mo may be close to English word “well”.

Do-mo.
A magic word.
Show your feeling
By hiding your thoughts.

Ak-shu, the shaking hands

Ak-shu [a k sh] means shaking hands.

As I said before, Japanese greet with bowing.We rarely touch other people’s body.

People from shaking-hands culture may be surprised at how weak and shy hands a Japanese has.
We Japanese are simply not accustomed to it.

Please greet us with bowing.

Well, as a theatre practitioner, I teach shaking hands (truly, they need to be taught!) to university students and global business people — many times with executives.
I also find that business executives from other Asian countries also love to know how to shake hands.

But do you know how to shake hands properly without awkwardness?  
Shaking hands is a part of acting techniques.
It’s that difficult!

Ojigi, the Bowing

When you meet somebody, you greet.

It’s the first and most important starting moment of communication which must lead to interaction.

Many countries use shaking hands for greeting.
In Japan, greeting is mainly done by bowing,
O-ji-gi [o ji gi].

Bend from the hip joints is the key for looking great.

Try with breathing.

Ready;  stand up straight.
Set; take a breath in.
Action; bend from the hip joints, with breathing out.
And; come back from the hip joints, with taking a breath in.

Ojigi.
Beautiful Japanese custom.
Giving your head.
Showing no harm.
It’s the sign of most sincere trust.

De-a-i, the first contact

De-a-i 出会い in Japanese means the first contact.

Nowadays, the word De-a-i is used specially wishing for meeting ideal people.

I am waiting for the De-a-i moment.
Are you?

De-a-i.
Important.
Wishes.
Waiting for the moment of a dream.

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